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lottos and in the stouthe states. they were sold as a way of funding education . that didn't happen. they are dependent on the general fund. cash strapped states that depend on the lotto, you will cripple the funding for the states is it a bad idea. it robs peter to pay paul. >> johnathon, you wouldn't be cutting wayne off. >> i am keeping quiet. wayne has to check his calculator. 580 million jackpot would pate zero.zero 3 percent of the national debt. we don't need a new plan to pay off theebt. we need a new philosophy and not exasbrate the debt. in a fully free society a lottery is a great way to fund the because it is voluntary. they would gladly to pay it to protect people's rights. >> it doesn't cover the whole bill. every little bit counts and i kind much i love you john, but i disagree. if anybody was sucker enough to buy a powerball they will spend two dollars in the national level because the pot is bigger. people who are inclined to pay will play regardless of state and national. you can create lottos around the world. people will play. >> you can't win if you don' play. j
. and millions in lottery ticket to go to education to make our kids smarter, today, sadly, they are only getting dumber. while we open our hearts let's not lose our minds. the folks deserve better to be locked out of a lockbox, and to be taken by greedy politicians who find other uses on the backs of that. not fair, not right. not remotely the thing to do. to staten islander john d'backo who knows of what i speak. he took matters in his own hand with his brother and buddies, made things right, here is john on the phone with the story. you quickly seize the initiative and did a lot more on just a local level. than fema. >> well, neil, as you know my house was affected my family was, but after stabilizing our situation we took a look around two days later, and we saw a bunch of federal response, out there with clip boards taking notes but we did not see boots on the ground helping people. yes my brother derrick and a few of hour close friends got out there, and started up a volunteer 100% grassroots effort, mobilized within a day or two over a hundred volunteers, and at this point we probably take
for college education as well. >> dealing with the mortgage interest deduction would hurt the middle class. >> if you take it in isolation. it depends how you balance it off. the rubric for us is, in has to be balanced. it has to be fair. it has to be comprehensive. it should be on the table to be discussed. we do not think that randomly you can pick things out, without understanding the unintended consequences that would provide. >> on the mortgage interest deduction -- i have a bill setting out there, trying to garner some republican support, that takes away the mortgage interest deduction for yachts that count as second homes. mr. larsen is talking about a schoolteacher trying to make sure it is affordable to buy a home, while there is a mortgage interest deduction available to people who buy yachts. that is coming from the person who represents the land of 10,000 lakes. i do not see a yacht in minnesota. that is the type of reform we are talking about. instead of signing on for that, they come to the middle class. that is where the frustration and fairness lies. >> we have heard from y
in -- >> i've been transformed. >> you said government needs to educate people. i said educate. >> people need to understand that certain people are very, very susceptible to this. if you take -- let's just take that bottle of nasty stuff there. let's say we take that right there if you say that i can't have a 16-ounce, what am i going to 2005 i have an issue like food addiction. honey, i'm going to score some other way. you can charge me. you can make me run around with eight ounces instead of 16 ounces and i'm going to score this thing and you can't do a thing about that. >> you're against mayor bloomberg's soda size thing but you say in your book, make free programs available to get people to detox and get off these foods. >> didn't say government. i said, can we have programs -- due know what the free programs? they're already in exist tense and done by private organizations. we have overeat efforts anonymous, food addicts anonymous. >> not government. >> no, nothing to do with government. these are free. don't cost a dime, and we actual agree about that. i told you i was stosselizeed
that only the truly informed, the truly educated, can somehow know what direction this country should take. i often thought the reason why warren thought that is because in combat, like john and others and bob dole and danny, they served next to ordinary people with 8th grade and high school educations. for me, all of the things that have been said about warren i could repeat and it would emphasize what you already know about them. the reason why i martin so much is the reason i just stated -- the reason why i admired him so much is the reason i just stated. i never met a man in all of the time i have served with the single exception of daniel inouye who had the grit -- in ordinary americans. the thing i like best from warren is when he said, just tell them the truth. that is what he always did. he told the truth. we all have a slightly different perspective, his honesty could be searing, but his compassion was always profound. that is a rare combination for any man or woman. he believed that the coolest lives are often told in silence. he would come up to you and say, i was flat wrong. le
, no matter your age, education or experience as long as you have a little spare time. you can literally earn money from your own laptop on your own kitchen enemitable 24/7. but, you know, can't do it unless you check it out. so if you are sick of living paycheck to paycheck worried about job security or retirement, if your goal is to earn extra money from home participated time or full-time -- part-time or full-time, incomeathome. giving away a thousand bucks to somebody just for checking them out. that somebody, lucky person, could be you. check them out at incomeathome.com. >> that's incomeathome.com. sort of at a standstill right now over the fiscal cliff with president obama making it very very clear he's got a plan. he's put it forward. president obama says we need a combination of spending cuts and new revenue. he put out the spending cuts and he said the new revenue has to come with from getting rid of the tax cuts on the wealthiest of americans. meanwhile, we will get a tax cut to the 98 -- to 98% of americans, up to $250,000 a year, and the repu
with manufacturing that have left the u.s. not necessarily people but the education stops producing them. >> that's sad. how do we get that back? sbl well, it is a concerted effort to get them back. with this project that i've talked about where we will do a mac in the united states next year? i think this is a really good another step for us. the consumer electronics world was really never here. so it is not a matter of bringing it back, it is a matter of starting it here. >> good morning. thanks for joining us here. >> reporter: while steve jobs liked to avoid the spotlight, he also thrived on it. it was as if he was selling products that were pieces of his own soul. he was inventor, pitchman and new wave pid piper all in one. big boss coming through. big boss, people. look alive. >> reporter: tim cook is just a different guy. while he believes in the almighty product just as much. >> how are you not steve jobs? >> in many ways. one of the things he did for me that removed a gigantic burden that would have normally existed is he told me on a couple of occasions before he passed away to never qu
. he believes that education is an economic imperative, but there is talk about getting rid of the deduction for student loan interest. >> really. >> that's a big one for a lot of people just out of school. >> this would be tremendously bad pr when we're looking at students with debt loads over $25,000. so this interest -- >> that's the average now? >> yes. and if you make, though -- this is really target towards students that are starting out and trying to get on their feet. you cannot take this deduction if you make over $60,000. so let's say they pull that back. and they pull it to you need to make $40,000. if you make more than that, you don't get it. i understand. but this would be a really bad whammy to basically students looking to get ahead. it is a big deduction for them and saves them hundreds if not thousands every year. >> if we go over the cliff, there's talk about what it would mean for unemployment benefits. again, the economy is doing a little better. the unemployment numbers have been a little better, but what's the impact? >> 2 million people -- >> 2 millio
. that is also true for other highly educated federal workers. i wanted to make that point. the other thing is that one point that is not obvious all the time is that when a congressman or congresswoman come in -- comes in and leaves 15 or 20 years later being a much wealthier individual. can you address that, please? thanks very much for c-span. guest: i would echo that for c- span. that is tough. my role and out of act as a longtime observer of congress for the last 30 years. there's been a number of pieces of research that have been done in the last few years. most prominently was a cassette in 60 minutes" piece about members of congress stock trading -- was "60 minutes" piece about members of congress stock trading. i have to tell you -- i do not see it. members of congress by and large are hard-working people spending their time on what their constituents need and want. if they are trying to get rich in congress, they get caught and go to jail. we have high-profile examples of that happening in the last few years. some of the journalism, some of the stuff that has come out in the last
is education, and how to make higher education cheaper. how to reform programs. what would be the number one thing that you would do that you can do as a freshman minority senator? >> well, i don't think there's a number one thing, but a number of number one things, and we have to do them all. as a 21st century student, doesn't look like it. it's not just an 18-year-old that graduated high school. that still continues to be a significant part of the folks that are going into college, but it's also the 38-year-old who decided to go back to school to get a degree. that was my sister's experience. it's also the 25-year-old after ten years after being out of high school is stuck in service jobs and deciding they want to empower themselves with new skills. the great news is that technology advances are going to not only lower the time and cost of getting that kind of skill acquisition, but will make it, you know, much more accessible, and with we have to ensure our student aid programs are not in the way of it. right now, we have a student aid program, the pelle grants or the loan programs, they
, gosh. i would lean towards jeb at this piont because he has really been pushing education. right now, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that are coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house was let's fix this problem by incorporating a small businesses and less government intervention to curb the deficit. it has been astronomical. then i heard barack obama say the way we are going to do it is by making more cuts in various ways. he was saying by
of their subjects. as a result, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> the early dividends announced by some companies to avoid higher tax rates are paying off for the ceos and their investors. take larry ellison. he's the ceo of oracle. they are paying dividends three quarters ahead. that means a payday for mr. ellison of $198 million. his shareholders will also do very well and i wish them all happy holidays to beat the tax man. now, president obama wants higher revenues and higher tax rates but you know it often doesn't work out that way. in fact from kennedy to reagan to clinton to w. bush lower tax rates frequently increased tax revenues, particularly at the upper end of the income stream. so here now to discuss this we have cnbc contributor keith boykin a former clinton white house aide and forbes media chairman steve forbes author of freedom manifesto, why free markets are moral and big government is not. love that. hey steve and keith. keith boykin i'll give yo
deductions. not enough revenue. less revenue equals more cuts in education. republicans ruled that out saying the new revenue would not be achieved through higher tax rates which we continue to oppose. they were referring to an erskine bowles plan that he testified to in the fall of 2011. the white house made it clear that's a nonstarter and they won't even respond until the gop puts forth a plan that includes a tax rate hike. the obstacle continues to be republicans who hold out hope. millionaires and billionaires. while it sounds like the two sides are far apart, the budget numbers are not that far apart. the white house you get close. they say it lacks detail. doon pfeiffer says it does not say which loopholes they would close or savings they would achieve. if the president is rejecting this middle ground offer it is his obligation to present a plan that can pass both chambers of congress. are we at a stalemate who offers something next? house republicans said theirs mirrors one proposed by erskine bowles, the democratic chair of the fiscal position. bowles shot down that suggestion. while
research shows... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. ♪ ♪ >>> at times, i know it can feel like the entire world is stacked against you in this game. >> the house of pain. >> europe's in a nasty recession, united states could be on the verge, well, of returning to the great recession because our leaders can't rise above and agree on anything. and china's still struggling to get their act together and beat their own slowdown. although the communists seem to be doing a pretty good job of breathing new life into their economy. look at that market last night. when you take a global view, all right, things stagnant. but there are still some bright spots out there. and believe it or not, one of the brightest is mexico. that's right. mexico has been getting its act together, industrial and automobile production south of the border are on the rise. and they're growing gdp faster than we are in the united states, much faster. just two days ag
... ... nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> welcome back to "hardball." now time for the "sideshow." first, 38 republicans voted this week to defeat a u.n. treaty that promotes rights for disabled citizens worldwide 37 last night jon stewart took them on. >> i guess it's time for a new segment "please tell me this is rock bottom." it's official, republicans hate the united nations more than they like helping people in wheelchairs. you voted no because your fear is if we sign onto a treaty that is only recommendations for improved disability standards, standards we ourselves made the law of the land in this country 20 years ago, what's to stop the men if blue helmets from storming into your living room, i'm sorry, school, and force you to build a wheelchair accessible ramp to the cafeteria. i'm sorry, your kitchen. >> and from the tea party right to the liberal left. we had massachusetts congressman barney frank on "hardball" this week for an i
products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco is there is not just going to be a chief data officer. there is also the office of civic innovation. jay's team, shannon's team. by having both of those units in place i think there is going to be a really powerful team. because you can't just open up the data. you have to do things like this, where you get th
that happened to peter because he is some weird educated doctor. maybe the nutritional advice we are getting is all wrong. back in the '60s believe that carbohydrates, bread, past ta were fattening. >> john: the picture of a piece of bread of butter on in your book. >> that is the idea it used to be the butter was considered healthy and the bread was consider fattening then the government decided it was something else and that coincides with obesity. >> john: they said margarine was bad for you? >> no it was good for you. >> now eggs are okay. >> and the reason for this flipping and flopping back and forth is because the kind of research we do to try and establish isn't capable of sort of establishing a definitive result. >> john: why don't we do this. it's important. >> it's really hard. you put the rat in the cage and it does what it does. >> john: double blind test with people. >> exactly. with drugs, it's real easy, it's take this pill or take this other pill. with nutrition, john i want you to follow this diet and it's hard to do. so we really can't measure what we think what we're meas
education is crushing economic futures. the fiscal cliff now 31 days away, still no mention of sequestration cuts. cuts in the pentagon budget with deadly consequences? can this congress and this president figure out how to do the right thing? admiral james lyons joins us next. this family used capital one venture miles to come home for the holidays. that's double miles you can actually use... sadly, their brother's white christmas just got "blacked out." [ brother ] but it's the family party! really jingles your bells, doesn't it? my gift to you! the capital one venture card! for any flight, any time! that's double miles you can actually use! how illuminating. what's in your wallet? let me guess, am on the naughty list again? ho ho ho! but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew what i could save before i switched to progressive. the better i drive, the more i save. i wish our company had something this cool. you're not filming this, are you? aw! camera shy. snaps
categories. access to education and the impediments i faced in my own life to education and how impossible it would have been for us to go to college if there weren't pell grants and student loans. it's the social realities and social changes that have occurred. you can't separate economic well-being from their social well-being. there are many young kids in america that are growing up in difficult circumstances raised by heroic parent, a grandmother in substandard housing, poor nutrition and schools that are failing. those kids are going to struggle. they don't go to after-school activities because the paints can't afford the fees. can you succeed? there are parents out there doing amazing things and will be the first ones to tell you, it is hard, but we can't be the country we need to be if we don't address that. government can have a role but civil society has a bigger role and we should support that and we have to address that and recognize it and talk about it. and maybe we haven't talked enough about that. i don't think that's the way to appeal to minority voters, that's the way to i
to the ppew report, these states rely on federal money. things like education would be impacted. they're here to put pressure not only on the president but lawmakers up on the hill to get this deal done. >> takes place in about an hour. dan loathian, reporting from th white house. >>> nearly 15 million households rely on food stamps. republicans say it's far too many. it's government assistance out of control. certainly a major theme during the republican primary. >> president obama has been historically the most effective food stamp president in american histor history. >> in light of the continuing controversy over food stamps, new jersey democratic mayor cory book booker will live on food stamps saying, quote, nutrition is not a responsibility of the government. >> as you mentioned this all sort of began as a back and forth on twitter. we'll get to that in detail in a moment. first i want you to look at something that mayor booker posted on his twitter account. it is a grocery store receipt from pathmark, detailing some of the things that he bought. you can't really see it closely but we c
to be recruited for work across the country. his innovative approach to education led him to develop a block format curriculum that emphasizes a student-centered active learning environment, allowing students to participate in experiencal education from the very beginning of their studies and complete their doctor al degree in just three years instead of the traditional four. making roseman one of the most affordable pharmacy schools in the nation. during his tenure, dr. rosenburg helped transform roseman of a local school of 38 students to a regional institution with over 1,000 and offering an array of quality programs in nursing, dentistry and business administration. mr. heck: as he prepared for retirement, i commend dr. rosenburg for his vision, innovation and commitment to offering students an affordable, state-of-the-art education that has and will benefit the state of nevada and the nation. thank you, mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from nevada yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from minnesota seek recognition? >>
equipment, in r&d, in science education and infrastructure and so forth. the question many people, sir, don't want to consider is where do we get those resources with those enormous debts? i asked our research department if they would make a reasonable prediction of how important interest costs would be if we did nothing, and their estimate without any explosion in interest rates was as follows: within 25 years or so, our interest costs would jump from about 1% of the gdp to 12% of the gdp or roughly four times the total investment made in r&d, science education and infrastructure. and if we ever permit that to happen, we will have assured that we're going to have what i call a slow growth crisis. and that's at least my way of formulating what happens if we don't do anything. but, mike, please, take over. this is your meeting, not mine. >> well, one of the things i don't claim to be here is an economics expert, although it's from a national security standpoint, and i've felt this way for years, that it's not just about the health of our economy, it's around the world, it's the health of eco
was involved in. >> absolutely. >> even dealing with kids and health and education and all the things. what really inspired her? what drove her? >> it is a remarkable -- 100 organizations. they say countless thousands of individuals that she helped along the way either through those groups or individually dispensing advice, money, you know, helping people out. the work she did with the hospitals was huge. the children's hospital in melbourne, a research center as well. i think it gives the answer to your question was she said when she was 99 she said looking out for people is the most important thing in life and is the most rewarding. happiness, i think, lies in thought for other people and trying to help them. i mean, whenever you think of rupert murdock or whatever else, this was a lovely lady. >> what does she think of her son's endeavors in the media and all the controversy around the empire? >> she was proud of all her kids. i actually knew rupert murdock's daughter, elizabeth, who was named after dame elizabeth too, and she used to speak fondly of her grandmother. this was 20 years ag
access to education and justice and transportation, all of the services that are essential and guaranteed by our constitution should be part of who we are. nonpartisan bipartisan, the argument that it would undermine united states sovereignty promote abortion, undermine care of children by their own parents, all completely unfounded. i hope that this may sound naive, once more of the truth is known by more of the people who can mobilize those veterans groups, more of the natural constituencies of both parties that we can prevail. >> eliot: look, one thing i know you are not from dealing with you as a lawyer, senator, naive, you are not. i think you're exactly right. let's hope that the light is shaneed on how fella cius their arguments are. senator, continue the fight as you always do. you never quit. senator dick blumenthal. thank you for joining us. >> eliot: will john boehner and mitch mcconnell actually leave this time? coming up next. ice breakers mints. break the ice. question: why are ice breakers mints called mints? answer in a moment. fruit just got cooler. fruit on one side, co
is not just to entertain you but educate and teach. call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. after a roller coaster day, the averages closed almost unchanged. dow gaining four points, nasdaq slipping slightly, 0.6%. we can talk all we want about what's going to happen next week in terms of earnings, stocks. and we will. but this time our game plan begins oddly and strangely on a sunday. sunday when the treasury secretary of the united states of america will be on "meet the press" addressing the fiscal cliff situation. as a student of secretary geithner who has studied his every move, i believe he will trace out how we are going to avoid falling over the fiscal cliff and get a deal! in part because the two sides aren't that far apart. they sound like they are but they may not be. both sides recognize that we will be in a recession very quickly, maybe even as soon as the second quarter --. >> ah! >> if they don't compromise. so listen to me. the tax hikes are so severe. [ audience boos ] >> the spending cuts, particularly the cuts to the military, are so draconian even some of the most extreme republican
a big difference. so our people are looking at it, we're helping them, we're educating them, but i think decisions are going to be held on how we're going to handle it until after all the rules have been released. >> it would make a big difference because you have so many seasonal workers for 90 days versus the year? >> yeah, just overall cost. as you look at the turnover and all the rest of it, it's going to make some difference to us. there's a 30-hour limit, but there's been some discussion as to whether or not that could be 35. 35 would clearly be better. so i mean, there's just a lot of these rules that are yet to be written and i think they're going to have a big impact on how people are going to approach it. >> so, patrick, let me try to take this from a difference direction from a democratic perspective. i'm not trying to be difficult. but there are two ways to look at the mandate that goes with the employees. one s a burden on business. the other is it's an opportunity for business to attract and keep employees, particularly in seasonal jobs that are difficult to fill. is there
teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] while you're getting ready for the holidays, we're getting ready for you. tis the season. for food, for family, and now, something extra -- for you. >>> the internet security guru john mcafee is wanted for questioning in belize in the death of his neighbor. the strange tale began in early november, when mcafee said someone poisoned four of his dogs. dogs whose barking was apparently a source of tension between the two neighbors. two days after the dogs were poisoned, mcafee's neighbor was shot in the head. mcafee says he didn't kill him but that he's afraid for his own life and that authorities in belize are after him because he refused to pay a bribe to a politician. cnn's martin savidge was the first reporter to find mcafee and interview him on camera since he went on the run and the details surrounding that exclusive interview were almost as bizarre as the case itself. take a look. >> reporter: the search to find john mcafee be
, he is -- he's a real leader. he's really smart. he's very well educated, has a graduate degree. he was raised all over the world because his parents were both in the military, both of them. and he has these core values. he was elected captain by his teammates as a rookie quarterback early on because he's signified this. i mean, this is a guy who helped put six points on the board after fumbling, a rare fumble, if you saw that play on monday night. >> yeah. >> sort of a weird play. we were all screaming, you know, that was a fumble! because obviously, if it hadn't been, it wouldn't have been six points. mike, he is really a very special character. this is not just spin. >> sam stein, i realize you went to school in the woods up there in dartmouth, but the idea of living in a metropolitan area, washington, d.c., where nearly everyone is obsessed with a single individual, the quarterback of the washington redskins, is incredible. >> andrea says this is not spin, but she's literally spinning. it's unbelievable, she's so happy with this guy. he fumbles correctly, this man walks on water
at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relationship. together for your future. ♪ >>> investors are being pushed to the sidelines, temporarily. apple shares hit, watch the stock down about 2%. casino stocks also under pressure on worries that the chinese government is increasing scrutiny over some of the macao casinos. oracle declared an accelerated second, third and fourth quarter dividend totaling 18 cents per share of outstanding common stock. this announcement comes ahead of a folks dividend tax increase next year. back to you. >> seem marks thank you. power run down time. joining us, cnbc's kayla tausche, john carney. start with a new study finding high-freque
to education. we've got to work hard every day to make certain that it's good quality and that it's affordable. i think it is fair for us to compare ourselves to other nations. we are talking primarily about the western industrialized nations where their delivery systems are much less expensive to deliver care and whereby the measures of things like infant mortality, obesity, other factors, they have better outcomes than we do. whatever it is you are delivering as a service, education or health care, we should always try to examine are we doing it the right way and can we do it better. even if we say we don't want universal health care, if somebody gets sick, most of the time they end up in the hospital and they will get care. the cost of that care has simply shifted onto everyone else who is paying insurance. if you have health care at work, $1,100 of your premium goes to paying for uncompensated care, for people that short at the emergency room without coverage. host: on twitter -- guest: she's right in a way, because it's not a cliff. this is the design of speaker boehner and other republic
for the republican party in one of the things he taught about is education and how to make higher education cheaper, how to reform programs. what would be the number one thing you would do that you can do as a freshman minority senator? >> i don't think there's a number one thing. you've got to do them all. the biggest obstacle we face as a 21st century student doesn't look like a 21st century student. send each other graduated high school. it's a significant part of the folks going into college, but it's also the 38-year-old who decided to go back to school and get a degree. does my sister's experience. it's a 25-year-old who after 10 years has been stuck in the service area jobs and decides they want to empower themselves with skills. the great thing is technological advances will not only lower the time and cost of getting that kind of skill acquisition, but are going to make it much more accessible. we have to make sure student aid programs don't stand in the way of it. let me give you an example. right now what we have are the pell grant for the loan programs. the accredited institution. ditto
't progress very far at all. , i mean, it was education for people who weren't steeped in the budget. [inaudible] and others were, but, you know, there was very little progress. we then went out to andrews and if anything, the situation was worse. i have my authorizization access from the andrews summit, which i didn't realize i had until the tree fell on our house in sandy, my wife went to the attic to clear it out so the guys could put a new roof on, she said what are you saving this stuff for? [laughter] and i looked and i thought, this is what i'm saving it for. [laughter] and my number is 108, and, you know, i wasn't the lowest ranking person there. and so, you know, it was a room where good food was consumed as people have already mentioned, but there was a whole lot of staff on and on until 2:00 at night sometimes, and very little, you know, happening in the way of progress until much smaller group the eight people largely without staff met and speaker follow foley's officers. there was an agreement reached in which -- as pointed out the hurdle half way down the track and was
, their students achieve at a higher level. let's develop more stars in education. let's invest in our teachers... ...so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. >>> ahead this morning on "morning joe," the united states of subsidies. "the new york times" launched a ten-month investigation on how cities and states attempt to lure in big business. we'll bring in the reporter of the lead story to find out what she learned. >>> and up next, john heilemann. >> oh. >> he enters, i leave. >>> also, nbc news capitol hill correspondent kelly o'donnell. the latest on the behind-the-scenes negotiations for the fiscal cliff. we're back in a moment. having you ship my gifts couldn't be easier. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to
is not going to take my baby. ♪ ♪ aids will not take our future. ♪ ♪ our weapons are testing... education, care and support. ♪ ♪ and aids... ♪ ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing... a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcare. with this plan, you can get copays as low as a dollar through a preferred network pharmacy like walgreens -- where you'll find 8,000 convenient locations. best of all, this plan has the lowest part d premium in the united states -- only $15 a month. open enrollment ends december 7th. so call today or visit your local walgreens. >> gretchen: we are celebrating the holiday and christmas today. we set out to do something that is incredibly scary. but you know what, you have nerves of steel my friend, and now you have experience. this is your third year? >> if is or i have a short-term memory. one or the other. it is probablyy the latter. brian is take all out. and you are sure it is all set up right?
currency trading on fridays 5:30 eastern and if you want more education about currencies, go to currency class@money motion.cnbc.com. >>> a bigger than expected slide in the past week down by 2.4 million barrels. crude supplies fell by 2.4 million barrels. 7.9 million barrels was the rise in gasoline inventories. then we are also looking at fuel supplies that were up by 3 million barrels. up by 3 million barrels. we are looking right now at a sell-off in the oil market. we're still holding above the $88 mark for wti crude futures. we're also looking at lower prices for gasoline because of that huge build we saw and higher prices for heating oil. a proxy for diesel fuel and reflecting the distillate fuel supply number. bigger builds than were anticipated for gasoline and a bigger decline than was expected for crude supplies. send it back to you. >> thank you so much. when we come back, deal making in a post-fiscal cliff world. faber has an exclusive interview with the ceo of investment bank moelis and company. more in just a moment. >> announcer: the holiday season is here and that means
, early childhood education 12-1 on the return. you can't get that on the stock market. >> stephanie: representative you guys stay strong and keep fighting because i gotta say you know, you look at any poll and people are with us on these issues, you know. you can look at -- >> i agree. >> stephanie: tax cuts proveably caused these deficits. the social security does not -- doesn't add a cent to the deficit. >> i ran on this in a conservative district very clearly stated my position that i did not want to. i had to last time when the president asked us to, to extend all of the taxes for one year and that was a darn bitter pill for me to swallow. i was one of the democrats that voted on to get it through. i'm not going to do it again. it doesn't add to the economy and those top 2 don't need to get done. we all do agree on the bottom ones and i just -- i think now they've got themselves in a pretty tight box. i hope you keep beating the drum on this. >> stephanie: i think you're a helper. you're giving
in education, including investment in infrastructure, including investment in innovation to grow our economy which in turn will help our deficit situation as the economy grows. without raising any taxes. but the fact of the matter is i know the gentleman has historically not felt tax cuts should be paid for either by reducing it or offsetting. the president doesn't agree with the $800 billion because he doesn't think the math works. i share the president's view. the math doesn't work. the most useful effort will be if we all agree on the onive -- objective, whether it's $4 trillion, whether it's 70% debt to g.d.p. ratio which most economists or a little less than that is sustainable or is on a sustainable path. if we all agree with the objective and then, mr. majority leader, simply make the math work to get there on a way that we could agree on, i think america would be advantaged, the economy would be advantaged and we'd see a renaissance of job creation in this country as we did in the 2000's. and i'll be glad to yield to my friend. mr. cantor: i accept the gentleman's good intentions. i
to addressing the concussion crisis through research, treatment, education and prevention and he is the author of the new book, called concussions and their kids, america's leading expert on how to protect young athletes and keep sports safe, written with marc hyman who is with us here today as well. so dr. cantu, what is the central thesis of your book here? >> first of all time i would like to thank you in the aspen institute for convening this conference today and for inviting me to participate in it. i think before i answer your question, i would like to start i just simply saying i am pro-sports. i want every sport to be continued and i wanted to be played in greater numbers, and i believe all of the opinions that i hold are trying to have that happen although right now maybe not everybody fully believes it. football's value is the exceptional exercise obtained in playing it. the last time i checked, it was the minutes if not hours of physical activity playing the sport that counts, not the milliseconds of bashing heads. as for the medical director of the national center for catastrophic
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